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is a matter of social justice. but if we can't have environments where students feel comfortable attending school, being comfortable with themselves and in themselves in a school environment we will never have students that are predicated in a way to be able to learn. we have to have safe schools. so what we did this year, when all of our administrators came back from summer break, every administrator from principals to the purchasing manager, everyone saw bully this year. and we spent a full year with our bifl department of student, family and community resources, we spent a full day debriefing that movie and going through a process where we talked about it and it was amazing to see grown adults having these realizations about what bullying meant to them and having a commitment from every administrator in our district that we will not allow that to happen this year and that will be one of the focus areas this year. so the ability to have these children now watch the movie as well was extremely moving to us yesterday. i just have to share one anecdote from that movie. we had a question
in our first panel, business creating a healthy safe and inclusive environment for all school students, the role of our federal government. tom perez, assistant secretary for civil rights, ruslyn lee. she was also nominated by president obama to serve in her role as assistant secretary of education for civil rights and she was confirmed by the senate in may of 2009. as assistant secretary, ruslyn is assistant secretary arnie's duncan's primary advisor. before she joined the department of education she was vice president of the education trust in washington, dc and was the founding executive of education trust west in oakland. in these positions she advocated for public school students in california, focusing on achievement and opportunity gaps, improving can urriculum and instructional quality and ensuring quality education for everybody. she served as an advisor on education issues on a number of private ipbs institutions, she is a teacher, a lawyer, and a very influential voice on all policy matters. she was also passionate about ending this issue of bullying and bringing eve
, they may be hurting others. bank of america became some of the highlighting in a low-rate environment. sf servicing more loans and making less money from them. a report card for the good and the bad of the fed's low rates! the housing market, especially mortgage borrowers, have been the biggest beneficiary that began in 2008. close to 20 million mortgages have been refinanced since then. mortgage applications were up about 5% last week and the mortgage banker's association says the purchase index is at its highest level in two years. >> homes are just incredibly affordable because of these very low rate that is have been there to push down interest rates. >> low interest rates are getting consumerinto auto-showrooms. new car sales could top $15 million this year and negotia negotiating monthly payments that take away much of the new car sticker shock. both consumers and businesses are paying off or refinancing debt. consumer refinancing is at its lowest level in a decade. approximately $70,000 per household. >> we've seen corporations clean up their balance sheets even more so. they've ta
answer. you can reduce the risk of an incident but you cannot create a fail/safe environment. certainly not along a 26-mile plus path that goes through commercial, residential areas. it is difficult enough at an ampitheater, race track, gymnasium, or stadium. i think we'll see in the future perhaps additional security but there are certain venues that it is very, very difficult to maximize to a point where you're fairly competent that nothing can happen and certainly a marathon is one of those kinds of events. as you and i both know every day in this country there are multiple venues where hundreds if not thousands if not tens of thousands of people for social, political, athletic reasons show up. so there will be lessons learned based on this tragedy. there will be probably a little more inconvenience down the road about -- i read with great interest that the london marathon is going on. pittsburgh is having a marathon next week. they have not canceled that. they're encouraging the runners to go. there was an interesting piece by tom friedman today in the "new york times." he basically
to get business pools fix for this environment, and we think this $52 million will be sufficient. >> i will end there, but i have other questions for the record. that last question was and did you and i have talked about that maximizes delivered to veterans in tough locations, rural locations, so i thank you for that effort. >> senator blumenthal? >> thank you, mr. chairman, and i apologize for being late, but i have been following some of the testimony and want to thank you all for your service, and, mr. secretary, particularly for your active-duty service to our nation and now in the department of veterans affairs, and to the president for increasing resources available veterans in a very difficult time to escalate. let me begin with senator begich's question relating to electronic health record. i understood that you describe what was going to happen, but i am not sure that i heard what the target date was. he asked for a target date for completing the program. >> we're talking about claims here. >> the electronic record system. recordelectronic help system is still going forward. >
back to what is a normalized environment. what does that even mean? i can't value it. i don't know how to value. >> i think it's interesting, the mainstream press. the front page of the washington post is the spring swoon and how we cannot seem to escape this economic decline and we've seen the past couple of springs and the front page of the journal is walmart and kohl's taking more time to pay their supplier, a trend they say is getting worse. those are not marginal positives, jim. i look at bank of america. i look at j.p. morgan and i say i'll pay 83.5 for 50,000 j & j. the trade is i don't want to mess with the stuff. proctor, look, he's making the quarter. he's going to make the quarter. >> raw costs coming down and coca-cola, by the way. raw costs are coming down, but they will come down. another one that is just where people are hiding. david, it's hide and don't seek. >> it is, but to carl's point, we've come out of the last few years and animal spirits start to feel strong. >> right. underlying economic growth is strong and everyone is revising up their gdp numbers up to three
and it's particularly challenging in this fiscal environment. the administration's $39 billion budget deficit request makes some very tough choices. it cuts the department's budget by roughly 2%, below 2012 levels. but it's the least consistent with what the congress appropriated in 2013 for the epartment. stepping back and thinking of all the challenges that our country and this department have faced since 2009, christmas day bomber, time square bomber, yemen cargo bomb plot, hurricane sandy and the ever-changing and ever-growing cyberthreat, and now the boston attack, it's easy to become concerned with this budget request. that said, we're facing extremely difficult budgetary times and sacrifices must be made. and while i recognize important missions may not receive all of the funds they or we would want in a perfect world, all departments and agencies in government must share in the sacrifice to some extent required to iranian in our deficit -- rein in our deficit. our secretary seems to have taken this message to heart. identifying some $1.3 billion in cost savings this year and m
environment. in my previous discussions with general allan, it is obvious the right level is closer to the 352,0020. that the 2013 and 2014 fighting seasons are critical to setting conditions for success and i worry that inadequate funding will erode the fighting capability of our troops on the front line. president's budget proposal last week has to address the unprecedented resource challenges facing our military and will hurt the readiness of our military. to preserve our place, the navy is tying up carrier strike groups. the air force is surrounding aircraft. the effect of this deteriorating readiness will be felt by the fighting forces in 2014, by the men and women we sent into combat next year. the president's must get serious about working with the congress on a lasting solution to the challenges facing our military. the troops fighting for this nation deserve nothing less. i think you very much -- i thank you very much. >> thank you. welcome. >> good morning distinguished members of the committee. i appreciate the opportunity to represent the men and women of the u.s. forces of the afg
or the environment around the bomb. >> but the bomb may have hit other metal objects that then splintered apart? >> this is what i'm hearing, although i certainly don't know that for a fact. the operations that we have performed are identical to the kind of work we would do in the army at a forward surgical team or combat support hospital. >> well, again, we know there is heroism, large and small at all times at mass general, and we thank you so much for joining us. i know you've got at least five surgeries today. we'll let you go back to work. >> thank you very much. >>> and coming up next here, a nation on edge. other cities in america, after the tragedy in boston. and chantix helped me quit. i honestly loved smoking, and i honestly didn't think i would ever quit. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix (varenicline) is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. it put me at ease that you could smoke on the first week. [ male announcer ] some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions wh
practice in the environments they're in all the time outside of school. >> and i would say that having listened to the word "media literacy" as far as back when i was carrying 3-inch quarter cassettes years ago and it was a great job. it really was. to teach media and digital literacy out of context is a fool's error and we have the boring curriculums in the world and teaching it out of the context. >> we have to stop blocking. >> yeah. i don't know. >> somebody -- okay. >> teachable moment. >> i hear everybody talk about -- >> thank you. >> yeah. so i have learned the phrase "teachable moment" since becoming a resource officer and i try to incorp rat that with a discipline situation and i try to use the teachable moment with the parents as well so you can move forward all together instead of just making everybody upset. >> i have some comments actually responding to what you asked about, the zero tolerance and different proposallity. one of my colleague and looked at this across the last 15 years and noticed a trend what we called "net widening and net deepening" and more behavi
. the environment is not agreed to. >> a few minutes ago, the minority in the united states senate decided it was not worth it. they blocked common sense gun reforms even while the families looked on from the senate gallery. >> a big loss for president obama and big loss from the fam faps from newtown who traveled to washington to lobby lawmakers and they lost on the big amendment that was agreed to by democrat manchin and republican toomey. republicans that voted yes, toomey and kirk and collins from maine and mccain from arizona. democrats who voted no. hicamp from north dakota. prior from arkansas . begas from alaska and baucus and reid. >> at the white house it was technically more bipartisan. even hoe harry reid did vote the way he did. i was struck by the want president's comments just before we went on air when he let loose on with a tirade. now, i don't think it was likely anyway. but the president is not -- and that is the way he attacks today . if you read the president's comments simply on the attack of the fellow red state demdements. it is a searing indictment of them and the
money printing. in those environments, gold does very well. you have the goldman sachs downgrade. you have people picking sides. then you have the slowing chinese debt. i think that really hits the market all at once. that led to margins being that and they continue to tumble downwards. dagen: talk about the difference you are seeing in behavior. are you seeing any selling among those physical gold owners? >> not as dramatic of a difference. we are a precious metals platform. on friday and monday, we had four to five times as many body and sell orders. we have done our own research. i think that plays into my point. it is somewhat reminiscent to what happened to apple. in the paper market, you have a dramatic selloff. in the physical market, the demand is very, very strong. connell: let's follow up on that. let's talk about apple. the big game for the dollar versus the euro. is that part of the case you make for gold? >> i think part of the reason is for safety. in times like this, i think now is a fantastic entry point. it is certainly better than two weeks ago. it is uncorrelated. t
that poison our water... and harm wildlife. and millions... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] >>> a juvenile court hearing was held for two boys. a 15-year-old committed suicide after pictures of a sexual attack were released. robert handa live with what could happen next. >> reporter: the first steps toward a possible trial took place here at the juvenile center. we were told by parties involved a judge was going to decide whether to keep the accused boys detained here or be released to their parents. the big legal decision remains, will they be tried as adults. >> reporter: the family of audrey pot and their legal team arrived this morning. the judge likely reminded everybody in the courtroom that today's hearing must be kept private and the pots family did so by leaving the center through a back entrance. leaving a message for the media. >> the hearings are confident because they involve juveniles. >>> whether a decision was made has not made public. a deputy attorney refused to confirm any details but said it would be up to his office whether juven
salai. >>> there's now two tree sitters staging an environment show down. tonight a man from fort brag who was arrested in this incident earlier this month returned to the trees. the protesters say the highway 101 bypass will devastate wetlands and pollute waters that are home to salmon and trout. they say it includes a $50 million project to wildlife. >>> peacing together the boston bombings. we talked to experts on how video and pictures that may appear useless could help break the case. >>> carnival's cost. what the company is in the process of doing. >>> and we'll show you which areas will be the coolest temperatures and possible frost in the morning. ♪ ♪ [ male announcer ] how do you engineer a true automotive breakthrough? ♪ you give it bold styling, unsurpassed luxury and nearly 1,000 improvements. the redesigned 2013 glk. the next great advance from mercedes-benz. starting at $37,090. >>> in campbell about a dozen people took part of a run. the informal run was organized by the owner of a sports shop. he said a number of his customers had qualified to run in the boston ma
and the rest of the middle east have more experience with terrorism. and their security environment reflect that reality. but here in the u.s., there is a delicate balancing act between liberty and security. and it's still a work in progress. bret? >> bret: steve centanni live here in d.c. steve, thank you. some of the most compelling accounts to come out of boston are from the eyewitnesses. and the people who tried to help. correspondent douglas kennedy has that part of the story. [explosion] >> the bomb that where to through boilston street took with it lives and dreams. in fact, many people in boston and the nation. especially those who saw the mayhem firsthand. >> it went off, you know, my ears, you know, just from the compression of the explosive device hit us and shattered the window next to us. and, you know, and i looked back and i see a cloud of smoke. >> it took probably five or ten seconds to realize what had happened because it couldn't happen there. so, it was just too surreal. >> still personal tragedy quickly turned into communal hope as the city almost instantly came togethe
. >>> there's now two tree sitters staging an environment show down. tonight a man from fort brag who was arrested in this incident earlier this month returned to the trees. the protesters say the highway 101 bypass will devastate wetlands and pollute waters that are home to salmon and trout. they say it includes a $50 million project to wildlife. >>> peacing together the boston bombings. we talked to experts on how video and pictures that may appear useless could help >>> in campbell about a dozen people took part of a run. the informal run was organized by the owner of a sports shop. he said a number of his customers had qualified to run in the boston marathon. >>> ktvu rob roth spoke to a former fbi agent with all the work involved to find those responsible. >> reporter: stitching together the many hours of video taken before, during and after the explosion is laborious but essential in solving the boston bombings. according to current and former law enforcement officials. rick smith says the fbi will use the videos to create a precised time line. >> who left the scene after or bef
? >> the average person? >> yes, absolutely. you can. >> what? >> when you go into an environment like this, first, you want to say am i indoors, outdoor, this is an outdoor event. where am i standing? are there trash cans near me? is there a mailbox near me? that can be a someplace where somebody can conceal a device. don't stand there. is there glass around me? get away from that, stand near a structure that's concrete, steel, brick. even if the blast is from a distance, the blast wave can shatter all that glass and severely injure or possible kill. >> do you need to be thinking about that? >> it's such a weird thing to think about. >> on a day when you're celebrating, you're not thinking about this. >> you should think about this all the time. wherever you go. whether it's a movie theater, the school, the mall. >> is it our new reality? and is it going to get worse? >> i think this is reality and i think that you should do this, it takes a few minutes, any place you go, what do i do if this happens. >> what do you think it does to your psyche? there are some people, i get it, you live your life
in arizona for the pat tillman run. >> it's not a secure environment, we can't put fences around it, can't put an officer every two feet, and we rely on all eyes out there. >> with so many groups out there, so many large events, regardless of the event, the security is knowing of the threat before the event occurs. that means intelligence and lots of cameras, electronic surveillance, and more law enforcement. >> i think the public, since 9/11, said we'll deal with that. >>> why finding out who carried out the boston bombing will help security officials everywhere. >> that was miguel marquez. we're learning more about this let goring to the white house. and now this letter, as we learned, is very, very similar to a ricin-laced letter set to a mississippi senator this week. we're awaiting this press conference with jay carney. >> yes, what i can tell you is that according to the street service on tuesday, a letter addressed to the president, that contained a suspicious substance, was intercepted at an off sight mail facility. if there is something suspicious or dangerous in it it can be sc
environment. so we think they have got a number of positive stimuli going forward. probably a cheap as pe that emc has had for several years. lori: gene, make us some money here if you would. really interesting defensive stocks really led this rally. what do you think if we're coming down now? >> well, you know, leadership has been in a lot of different areas, and not just year-to-date but over the last year-and-a-half. david: forgive me, guys, i have got to break in here. we have american express express earnings. dennis, what are the numbers? >> yes the numbers beat the street on earnings but fall below revenue. street wanted 8.03 billion. earnings per share, american express, 1.15 a share. street was thinking $1.12. that is a beat. quarterlyly dividend for amex raised 15%. the company will spend $3.2 billion extra this year on stock buybacks before year-end and another one billion dollars in the first quarter of 2014. stock buybacks support a stock price. can't tell, looks like amex might head down. wall street hate as miss even though earnings beat. lori: todd horowitz, earnings seaso
. as of today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post 9/11 environment. there are some key questions we wanted to address this morning. one, did the treatment of suspected terrorists and u.s. custody rise to the left of torture? second how did this happen and what can we learn from this to make better decisions to the future. we found the u.s. personnel in many instances used interrogation techniques on detainee's that constitute torture. american personnel conducted an even larger number of interrogations' with kroll and humane degrading treatment. both categories of actions violate u.s. law and international treaty obligations this conclusion is and based upon our own personal impressions, but rather grounded in a thorough and detailed examination of what constitutes the torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees and many instances met the standards. the courts have determined constituting torture. but you look at the united states state department and its annual country reports
chemicals that poison our water... and harm wildlife. and millions... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] >> following the latest with the bay bridge and those bolts that were found to be defective. jackie sissel is discovering more about these boats and their history. >> there are new reports out this morning indicating caltrans actually ordered some tests as early as 2008 on those boatsbulletolts. 96 of these bolts were put into the bay bridge. as they were being tightened, 33 of them actually it failed, cracked. the report today they say as early as 2008 there were questions about the integrity of these bowls and the manufacturer who actually made the bolts. that was the icing co. and ohio. caltrans ashley ordered additional tests on the bolts. they wanted to make sure that they were structurally it fine. for whatever reason, those tests were not done. one-third of the 96 bullets ultimately failed. why did tests were not done is obviously part of the investigation. how're they going to fix this? last week there was a press conference addressing this
to protect your device from the environment. that's generally where they've been used. colombia, thailand, maybe even in pakistan. so it is kind of odd that they would use that here in a domestic setting. but, again, they don't know -- they don't have any suspect at all. >> it's also important to point out that this is an investigation where all of the resources and intelligence community are being used and they will have a backlog of intelligence they have to go through, intercept, satellite intelligence, signal intelligence, which they can monitor all of this stuff in realtime. >> they can't. and from what they monitor on a daily basis, minute-by-minute basis, from known suspects around the world, they had zero indication from this event. now you go back based on what happened and what you do know, you check cell phone towers and those international conversations and run your traffic through suspicious groups around the world. just speaking to the boston law enforcement source, a federal source earlier today, and a sense of is it domestic? is it international, the answer i got from both
and take steps to address the environment degradation. the issues are polarizing. [laughter] but president grimson serve as iceland's finance minister. in 2008 he presided over iceland's near economic collapse. the country's unique response which included social and political reform and allowing the banks to pull pulled iceland back from the brink without the austerity measures. perhaps most challenging of all he raised twin girls. please hiv me give a warm national press club welcome back to president grimsson. [applause] [applause] >> thank you. thank you very much. for these words of welcome and thank you for hosting us at the national press club here today for a special occasion where i have privilege to announce the establishment of a new venue aimed at enhangs the dialogue on corporate issues. i know, sometimes here in washington, the arctic looks as if it is far away. perhapses in the minds of many, still the hidden part of the world as it was. in the beginning of the 20th century. where the knowledge of that the neighbor to our countries was still very limited. and in fact remains
and also some worries about the global growth environment. we think we may have a little bit of a pause here, but we're going to see continued growth through the year. it will be rewarded by take risk in the stock market. >> why? >> because with growth keeping up and inflation being under control, monetary policy is going to stay very easy, and we see that as being something that's going to lead to equity returns being positive. >> you have to admit, we've had a very good first quarter, 10% gains for most of the averages, 15% at the most extreme. aren't we due for a correction of some kind? >> well, we could absolutely have a pause here and a small correction wouldn't be off the realm, but without a big downturn in data or a big change in monetary policy expectations, i think it will be relative tame. >> what have you thought of the earnings so far this season? >> they've been modestly disappointing. we got some news today about corporate business jet appetite that was a little bit disappointing. but then look at the fed beige book report today, where they saw their seeing slightly impr
-term, but in this environment, where sentiment, we've got unusually bearish quickly. we've got more weakness in store. >> so you would wait. this isn't necessarily an entry point for you, yet? >> no, if i had cash on the sidelines, pretty much at the close of today, the average stock in the s&p 500 was off about 7% from its 52-week high. the average technology stock, 11% from its 52-week high, if we get another 3% to 5% down in stocks, then i think that cash on the sidelines should be absolutely put to work, because the next two or three years still bodes quite well for the stock market relative to most other asset classes. >> i may have to break in momentarily when those american express earnings come out. but first, jerry webben, let me ask you, the fear has been this week with news out of china, some of the economic data that we've gotten here, that maybe the global growth rate is slowing down. do you sense that at all? >> i think, yes, both in the u.s. and in china, we've seen some slowness in the emerging markets and europe remains extremely weak, but you've got to look at those growth areas in the u.s. wi
random metal and debris things picked up from the environment. all of that being pulled out of the bombing victims, bill. >> bill: tomorrow is going to be another emotional day. what are the plans as we understand them tonight, mike for the presidents visit at that church behind you? >> well, the president will come here to the cathedral of the holy cross just about 11:00. he will be accompanied by the first lady. it will be an interfaith service. the president is said to be delivering a message of shared pain not just with the people who were in the run itself or the people who live here in boston but the people -- the people in the run itself. and a shared sense of respect to the people who responded and saved lives. no word now if the president intends to visit with the victims and/or their families, bill. >> bill: mike, thanks. see you tomorrow. mike tobin from the church tonight. we are also hearing tonight from a hero by the name of tyler who helped comfort a young woman suffering shrapnel wounds from the terrorist attacks. yesterday the massachusetts governor devol pa
's something that would have to be part of an agreement and acceptable to republicans in this environment, it is something we can defend on a technical basis. it's more accurate and because for middle class people, you know, it's a burden that is relatively small. the most vulnerable even $10 a month for the most vulnerable is a big deal. if you live to be 90 years old and all you have is the social security, that $10 can be the difference between food in the last couple of days of the month. so i think we have to distinguish between what impact going a more correct measure would have. and we have, you know, put in a way that we think is fair. by saying that the most vulnerable have the benefit go up. not because we have the overall adjustment being faster. we will make the decision to go in and make sure they're not hurt. >> thank you. >> thank you, mr. chairman. thank you for appearing. i have four sets of questions i'm going run through quickly. supplementally. first thing has to do with the crap i look at the budget. how it's crurkted. because the choice of the underpinnings of the a
environment and have been a part since iceland was -- [inaudible] >> taking step back and looking for a broadly two things i've been talking about climate change and fishing. has global environmental change been benefit to iceland's fishery or a detriment? >> well, it's very difficult to an that question, indeed it's one of the big issues -- a number of decades because it has tradition nayly been the key part of the export driven fishing circle. of course the species as well. some people are arguing cue to the -- [inaudible] so one of the reasons why there is a need for more active arctic corporation is in fact to study what is happen together fishery in the ocean of the world including the arctic and the ice melt. and i found it interesting when i invited them to iceland a few years ago, he is, as you might know, a special envoy of the president of france on arctic and polar issues. his argument was that the first dispute that would unearth nationings to a new situation in the arctic would be dispute over fisheries. that the meting of the arctic sea ice and the transmore fashion
in the first quarter. there is not much opportunity in a low yield environment. we're looking low single-digit type returns. maybe mid single at best. i think emd is is one of those opportunities. central banks paused in the first quarter in most markets in emerging market countries. i think the bump in yield we saw in the first quarter is an opportunity. we still think longer term those economies grow faster than developed countries. much less debt relative to the size of the economy. lori: i have to sop you there. we have breaking news. >> that opens up potential easing in the coming months. lori: it is an important part of every once investment portfolio. anthony, thanks. we'll check in with you. >> thank you. melissa: we have more breaking news about those reports that investigators believe they have identified a boston bomb suspect. rich edson is live at the white house with more on this rich, what have you heard? >> here are the details. fox news confirming authorities investigating the boston marathon bodies have an image of a young man carrying and perhaps dropping a bag at the s
you can't change and your environment. you can thing about brain diseases as really a disorder of a lifetime. there are things we can do. we can stamen tally active physically fit, socially engaged, eat a heart-healthy diet. >> we do all those things. what else? >> we can avoid head injuries, we can protect ourselves, have good positive lifestyles, no smokes, drinking drug use. i think more importantly is when we find we have a problem go to medical attention really early because one of the biggest risk factors is diabetes and things. >> physiologically was there something? you said less atrophy. what about size? >> the size for 280-year-old looks like the 50-year-old brains and the pew people who had died they study under autopsy, they seemed to have more neurons, more brain cells in certain regions of the brain that are responsible for the higher order of processing. >> in the future do, you think there will be something you can do that will change things? is there a miracle drug? >> if we know why they're staying so robust in theory you can find somet
work environment, that their paychecks will arrive on time and the benefits they earn are the ones they receive. under president clinton, john served as deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary for law enforcement at the treasury department. overseeing the united states secret service and the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms. and he later moved to the interior department where he was assistant secretary for policy, management and budget, essentially the manager of the department of interior. before coming to the office of personnel management, john spent nearly a decade working on conservation as director of the fish and wildlife foundation, and then arguably the job he perhaps has enjoyed most, he became director of the national zoo. at the national zoo, he was so successful turning around a faltering institution that after he left they named a lion in his honor. john indeed was a lion, a lion on behalf of the federal employees, a lion on behalf of good government, a lion on behalf of integrity. john know he is a true leader and manager and an incredibly wa
an environment where cyberthreat information is shared in real time between all designate the federal cyberoperations centers to provide actionable information about all known cyberthreats. page 5, strike line 6 and all that follows through page 6, line 7. page 7, beginning on line 17, strike by the department or agency of the federal government receiving such cyberthreat information. page 13, strike line 13 and all that follows through page 15, line 23. page 17, strike line 15 and all that follows through page 19, line 19. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from georgia is recognized. mr. woodall: mr. speaker, i yield back the balance of my time and i move the previous question on the amendment and on the resolution. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, the previous question is ordered on the amendment and on the resolution. the question is on adoption of the amendment. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. the ayes have it. the amendment is adopted. the question is on adoption of the resolution, as amended. those in favor say aye. those opposed, no. in the opinion of
on destroying lives of innocent people. the best way in a school environment, in my view, is to confront that shooter with a traeupbt law enforcement -- trained law enforcement officer. the grassley amendment has money put back into the system that is president obama cut $300 million out of school safety at a time when i think that was very unwise. we restore that money. two months ago, maybe longer, there was a young woman at home in the atlanta suburbs with her two twin daughters. i believe they are twin daughters. there was a home invasion by someone who had just been released from jail. she took her children up into the closet on the second floor and hid in the closet, got on the cell phone call with her husband asking what to do. she grabbed the .38 revolver. the guy broke into the closet. she fired six times, hit him with the begun, hit him five of the six times and he was still able to drive away. in the hands of that mother, six shots were not enough. it wouldn't bother me one bit if she had 30 rounds. in the hands of a mentally unstable person or convicted felon, one bullet is o
. not clear if they're from the bomb itself or from -- from the environment around the bomb. the operations that we have performed are identical to the kind of work we would do in the army at a surgical team or combat support hospital. >> dr. king performed more than five surgeries on victims yesterday alone. >>> the thousands of runners still on the boston marathon's course when the bombs went off crossed something of a finish line yesterday in downtown boston. they were able to reclaim their belongings from marathon volunteers and given a medal for participating in the race. everyone had them. it had a unique story about this experience. >> of course, at first shock. you know not that i didn't believe my sister. nobody around me really seemed to know anything. nothing was out of the usual. runners kept going. but i decided to leave the route. and even running through the streets. >> her sister was across the street from where the bombs went off. she said the second blast rattled her teeth. she was hit by small pieces of shrapnel but unhurt. >> going back to those medals, really, that's wh
and my being chair of the democratic party and protection of the environment, civil rights women's rights, gay rights economic justice, social justice, central america, anti-quandra, you name it. casey kason was there. i marched alongside of him in so many rallies, i can't tell you. he was a wonderful, wonderful guy. he is best known for top 40. once in a while, he moot lose his temper as he did when he was once asked to give a dedication to a little boy who lost -- whose dog had died and then he had to suddenly go from that into some up-beat song, and casey wasn't happy with what his producers had done to him. here he is. >> dear casey, this may seem to be a strange dedication request, but i am quite sincere, and it will mean a lot if you play it. recently, there was a death in our family. he was a little dog named snuggles but he was most certainly -- going to start again. i am coming out of the record. play the record please. >> not happy when you come out of those up-tempo numbers, it's impossible to make those transactions and go into somebody
harsh, but is there a sense you put yourself in that environment enough that you are on borrowed time. the odds are such that you get hit anywhere, at any time. >> yeah. there vicious people and you care deeply about the world and they put their lives at risk. i got out. within the hour, i decided i had too many close calls. >> quickly. >> within an hour. you have to leave before you lose all your money. >> sebastian, which way is the frontline from here on hbo tomorrow at 8:00. thank you. we are going to make a move to breaking news on the boston medical center. dr. peter burke is talking to the press about the condition of the victims that are being treated there. . >> their lungs are not working and heart is not working and depending on what you bring to the table, that can be different. >> [inaudible]. >> not that i'm aware of. i'm sure it's available. the general process when you remove things from people we send them to the pathologist. that's the process. they will be available, i assume. we are talking about fragments taken out of the victims in this case. >> [inaudible]. . >>
environment. the ultimate goal is to put these into the gallery and be able to share is much of the operatedhow the pumps and how they were made. we know that the one in front of us up until almost the last moment was working hard to try to keep the ship from sinking. unfortunately, when the water pushes out the oilers -- ump stoppede p moving. >> i think of the crew of the monitor and the things they experienced and the struggles that they undertook to preserve the union and how ironic is that today, 151 years later, they are still serving the nation but in a very different way and in ways they could never imagine, for helping us understand marine conservation and about our past and helping us move forward and learn from the lessons of the past. to, looking at the history and literary life of virginia beach, virginia, including more from the mariners' museum, saturday and noon eastern on c-span2. and sunday at 5:00 on c-span3. >> "washington journal" continues. texaswe're back with republican louie gohmert, a member of the judiciary committee. thanks for being here. guest: n
create if they're released into the environment where they don't have any natural enemies. in seven weeks each female can produce 1200 eggs a year. yikes. will emerge from the ground after florida's rainy season ends. [ screaming ] >> import a bunch of frenchmen. >> stephanie: buy more butter. don't be left unprepared. >> they have python problem in florida and now they have sinkholes and now -- snails the size of buicks. >> stephanie: that sounds awful. >> and your hair would frizz. >> stephanie: not since that appearance for a miami station in august. my '80s hair again. [ explosion ] pay for a blowout straightening and i ironed it. like a minute and a half and. [ explosion ] i'm linked to mob squad again. >> no beauty or vanity in florida in august. >> stephanie: sweating! oh god. i would dry myself with a giant snail. sweating, that's all it is. all right. we were talking about -- oh, we still haven't gotten over the right wing caller even yesterday oh how come you aren't blaming obama? everyone blamed bush the same day 9-11 happened. [ buzzer ] which is complete crap. really bad anal
and debris, the kind of things that could have been picked up from the environment when the woman went off, jenna. jenna: mike, no arrests yet and we're seeing video from the scene that day, how is security in the city of boston? >> reporter: we are really seeing an increase in security. just behind me there is a armored vehicle parked in front of massachusetts general hospital. we see an increase in the yellowjackets of city police officers who are out there. state troopers increased their numbers in the city of boston by 100 to augment the city police there. they're deployed at every hospital. they're deployed at the statehouse and they're deployed at the metro boston transit authority stops. additional troopers have been sent to the airport, jenna. jenna: more on this as we get it. mike, thank you. jon: we are also following some breaking developments out of capitol hill after a letter sent to the office of senator roger wicker tests positive for the potentially fatal substance ricin. peter doocy is live outside the senate mail facility in hyattsville, maryland where the letter was inte
something. if you see somebody carrying something odd that doesn't fit in the environment, you should seek out law enforcement and bring it to their attention. >> gretchen: you say to look at the people around you. even to the point of no problem staring at them. why? >> yes. as people, we don't like to look at people. anything more than two seconds, you're scary and being rude. you know what? be rude. pay attention to who is next to you. what are they wearing? how do they look? how are they carrying themselves? look at their behaviors. what are they communicating to you not just verbally, but nonverbally. >> gretchen: know where you will evacuate. oftentimes when people get on airplanes, they'll say i'm five rows from the nearest exit. you're talking about just in general, right? >> yes. whether indoors or outdoors. this specific event, you're barricaded in in an area. you're watching the marathon go on. when you get there, assess. if something happens, i want two ways out. if something happens on this side, i will go out this way. if something happens on this side, i will go out that way
to be an environment for a screw-up like we had in 1986 when we spent weeks and weeks on legislation to get it right and we didn't get it right. i yield the floor, and i suggest the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: protect more of our communities. we are going to address the bears that prevent background checks and give law enforcement more information about stolen gun so i can do his job and help put in place a plan to protect her children in their schools. but we can do more if congress gets its act together. if this congress refuses to listen to the american people and pass commonsense gun legislation, the real impact is going to have to come from the voters. all the people who supported this legislation, law enforcement and responsible gun owners, democrats and republicans, urban moms, rural hunters, whoever you are here need to let your representative of congress know that you are disappointed and if they don't act this time you will remember come election time. to the wide majority of nra households who supported this legislation you need t
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